1 to 1 computing: Not a new idea. That’s the problem!

Many schools in the United States have started (years ago) to move to 1 to 1 computing. This means that every student in certain grades, at the very least, have a laptop. This is the direction of education. After all, students are using computers at home and LEARNING there. At school, why do we expect something different? 

The problem with this is that it is not new. I am writing this entry years after these initiatives have taken place. The longer schools refrain from even entering this conversation, the harder it will be to catch up. It is creating a digital divide. 

Students will need to be able to navigate the plethora of information available to them today and most importantly, tomorrow. Is it important that they memorize facts today that are continually changing or is it more important for them to be able to use the tools available to find, analyze and create? 

I know for myself, I use computers for nearly every task. I plan my lessons on a computer. I research, I create media works, I brainstorm, I communicate, I write, I collaborate and I edit on my computer.

Research has begun to surface that shows how efficient, productive and effective the 1 to 1 learning initiatives are. Realizing it costs a lot of dollars to provide every high school student (let’s say) with a laptop, it is nevertheless an important journey to investigate before it’s too late.

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